The Safe Schools Program, Communism, and the DLP

The Democratic Labour Party (DLP) was born out of the need to protect Australians from the increasing presence of communist influence within the labour movement back in the 1950s.

Communist ideologues infiltrated trade unions affiliated with the ALP and were able to dictate ALP policy in critical areas, which in those days included matters of foreign affairs and defence.

Dozens of ALP parliamentarians put their careers on the line by taking a principled stand in defending the labour movement from communism. They knew what was at stake; they knew that labour movement traditions of democracy, justice and fairness had been subverted.

Today’s DLP continues the fight of its predecessors.

One might have thought that the fall of communism internationally in the late 1980s and early 1990s would have ended its influence in policy matters in Australia.

However, the current controversy surrounding the ‘Safe Schools’ program and the recent suspension of the program’s chief architect and public face Roz Ward, proves that the opposite is in fact true.

Courtesy David Castillo Dominici at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Courtesy Divid Castillo Dominici at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The program, which is endorsed and financially supported by the Victorian ALP Government as an anti-bullying program, has come under heavy public scrutiny in as its content and true intentions have been slowly unearthed.

Far from being an anti-bullying program, ‘Safe Schools’ has been found to be stringently ideologically driven in its teaching of a contested and controversial form of gender ideology, and there is now widespread awareness that it has social re-engineering as its ultimate purpose.

Ms Ward is a seasoned Marxist activist, and her Marxist leanings have been well-known. However, as the program’s content and true purpose was unveiled, and following some radical comments she posted on social media, Ms Ward resigned from her advisory role with the Victorian government and was suspended by her employer, La Trobe University.

Federal Education Minister Simon Birmingham also called for Ms Ward to step down from the national steering committee for Safe Schools Coalition Australia, which has already severed its ties with the Victorian branch.

Clearly, the influence of radical left-wing ideology is still alive and well in Australia. ‘Safe Schools’ is nothing other than a continuation of the Marxist quest to destroy traditional structures and values, without you knowing about it and while you pay for it, under the guise of anti-bullying.

The bullying of any child, for any reason, is undesirable and unacceptable. Equally undesirable and unacceptable, is the indoctrination of our children in our schools by programs driven by radical ideologies, used as a platform for Marxist social engineering.

The DLP still has a reason to continue its defence of Australian principles and values against the infiltration of dangerous Socialist and Communist ideologies. 

We are the pro-family party and here’s the proof

Both the Liberal Party and the ALP talk about being pro-family but the simple fact is that they are not.

They give nothing but lip service to the importance of the family.

Whether it be their leaders marching in the Sydney Gay Mardi Gras, professing their support for same-sex marriage, doing nothing to make changes to the income tax system to allow a parent to stay at home, or standing idly by and letting our children be indoctrinated in our schools with Marxist and anti-family propaganda, both the Libs and the ALP are not fair dinkum about supporting the traditional family.

The Democratic Labour Party, on the other hand, has always been pro-family and we have policies that recognise the family as the foundation of our civil society.

Using the income tax system to allow for stay-at-home parents

Courtesy of photostock at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Courtesy of photostock at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The Liberals and the ALP have done nothing to use the tax system to promote the ability for families to have one parent stay at home, not have to work and instead devote their energies to raising a family.

The DLP will introduce income tax splitting to allow the income of the working parent to be split with the stay-at-home parent for tax purposes, thereby giving them more after-tax income and removing the need for both parents to work.

Only the Democratic Labour Party is committed to changing the way the tax system unfairly and inequitably penalises families.

Maintaining the institution of traditional marriage

The Democratic Labour Party will defend and stand up for the institution of marriage being exclusively between a man and a woman. Only the DLP will make sure that the Marriage Act remains unchanged.

Protecting family values

The ALP, Greens and many Liberals support the Safe Schools program which is being used by socially radical groups as a way to indoctrinate our children into accepting ideologies and causes that are controversial and simply anti-family.

It’s not a matter of parents having a right to withdraw their child from classes dealing with such matters. Children should simply not be indoctrinated with radical social re-engineering in the first place.

The Democratic Labour Party will scrap the Safe Schools program and ensure that our schools are never again used as a platform for social engineering designed to denigrate those institutions which put the family at the centre of our society.

Instead, the DLP will promote proven anti-bullying programs that will not be used as a means to indoctrinate radical social ideology, and which will teach our children emotional intelligence, such as the RULER Program from the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence.

 

Motion to scrap Safe Schools in Victoria divides Parliament ’18-all’

education2On Wednesday 26 October, Dr Rachel Carling-Jenkins brought a motion before the upper house of the Victorian parliament, calling on the government to withdraw the Safe Schools program from schools and to conduct a review of the program which would take into account the views of parents. This was the first motion of its type in any Australian parliament. 

In speaking to this motion, Dr Carling-Jenkins drew attention to a number of issues about Safe Schools that have caused a high degree of concern among parents and experts in the fields of paediatrics, education and child protection. 

From the outset, Dr Carling-Jenkins and the DLP have maintained that the bullying of any child, for any reason, is undesirable and unacceptable. Indeed, our children deserve the very best educational programs we can give them. 

Safe Schools is ideological and less about bullying than furthering the political and social agendas of the LGBTI movement to which it is intimately connected. Instead of being indoctrinated with such theories and agendas, our children deserve a program that builds their emotional intelligence and eradicates all forms of bullying, without controversy, without confusion, without causing concern to parents and without ideological bias. 

Click here to view Rachel’s speech 

Disappointingly, the government’s first speaker on the motion spoke beyond the negotiated time-slots, which prevented other members from contributing on the day. The debate would have been all the poorer for it, but thankfully the coalition and crossbench parties made extra time for debate to be resumed during general business on Wednesday 9 November. 

Click here to view Rachel’s ‘right of reply’ at the conclusion of debate 

The motion divided the house at 18 for and 18 against, which unfortunately meant the motion was defeated. However, the debate allowed many of the issues regarding the Safe Schools program to be brought to light, and it has generated a great deal of momentum within the community. 

Dr Carling-Jenkins and the DLP would like to thank everyone who has voiced their concerns about this issue, and everyone who has signed a petition against the program. Now is not the time to give up but to keep pressing forward. 

The fight continues.

Success in Campaign for Fairer and Unbiased Funding for Non-Government Schools

Courtesy of photostock and FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Courtesy of photostock at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Thanks to the efforts of hundreds of people who emailed, called and visited their Victorian State MPs about the dangers facing non-government schools under the proposed Education and Training Reform Amendment (Funding of Non-Government Schools) Bill, the DLP has achieved an important success in the Victorian Parliament.

Following intense negotiations between the Education Minister James Merlino and DLP upper house MP Dr Rachel Carling-Jenkins, on Thursday 26 February the Victorian Government agreed to abide by all the major principles put forward including the two crucial points listed below.

 

1. Membership of the School Policy and Funding Advisory Council:
The Bill provided that the Education Minister would appoint a representative of each of the Catholic Education Commission (CEC) and of Independent Schools Victoria (ISV), as a member of the Advisory Council. This would have been done without the CEC or ISV nominating their own representative. On Thursday, Dr Carling-Jenkins was able to negotiate the following result:

The Minister agreed to engage with Dr Carling-Jenkins and to consult and negotiate with ISV and CEC on the Terms of Reference for the new Advisory Council. The Minister further agreed that the representatives of ISV and CEC are to be nominated by those organisations. This was a key issue raised in the email campaign and one that the Government has now recognised completely.

 

2. Conditions of Funding:
Under the Bill, the Minister would have been able to impose whatever conditions on funding he decided were ‘reasonable conditions’. There was no definition of what was to be considered ‘reasonable’; this could have led to schools having their funding removed if they refused to accept a condition that compromised their principles.

After lengthy negotiations with the Minister and others regarding this extremely important section, the following result was achieved.

On Thursday 26 February, Minister Steven Herbert, on behalf of the Government and the Education Minister, made the following statement in Parliament:

The Government will consult with Independent Schools Victoria and the Catholic Education Commission before imposing any conditions on funding. This consultation would occur through the Advisory Council. This consultation will specifically raise the issue of reasonable conditions and will confirm that the Government’s intention is not to impose any conditions that would intentionally oppose any of the fundamental principles, objectives or governing laws of the non-government schools under consideration for funding or their parent organisations.

To ensure everyone was aware that the matter had been negotiated successfully and that there was no ambiguity as to what the Government had agreed to, Minister Herbert repeated a second time that:

The Government will consult with Independent Schools Victoria and the Catholic Education Commission before imposing any conditions on funding. This consultation will occur through the Advisory Council and will specifically raise the issue of reasonable conditions and confirm that the Government’s intention is not to impose any conditions that would intentionally oppose any of the fundamental principles, objectives or governing laws of the non-government schools under consideration for funding or their parent organisations.

 

With this statement, the hundreds of individuals, schools and organisations who emailed Victorian MPs relentlessly can take heart that their efforts have not been in vain. This campaign by the parents, teachers and others associated with ISV and CEC schools and by ordinary Victorians from all walks of life has borne great fruit. It shows what can be achieved when determined Australians make a stand in support of their principles.

In her speech to Parliament, Dr Carling-Jenkins read out a number of the emails that had been received by MPs. The email campaign impressed all MPs with its fervour and tenacity.

Rachel would like to express her sincere thanks to all who emailed, rang and visited their MPs in support of her amendments. She congratulates and sends her best wishes to all for their wonderful efforts:

“I would like to thank you personally for your show of support and for not being afraid to make your position known to the Members of the Victorian State Parliament. It often takes courage to stand up for your principles and to protect the rights and welfare of others and you can be proud to say you did that.”

 

To invest in universities is to invest in our future

Earlier this year, the Federal Government announced cuts of $2.8 billion to the expected funding for student support and universities, already on top of a $1 billion in cuts announced late last year.

 

I don’t know about you, but to me it really makes no sense.

 

According to OECD figures, our public investment in universities ranks just 25th out of 29 advanced economies. Meanwhile, the strongest nations in our region are investing more and more in universities to drive skills, science and research.

 

That is, nations in our region are investing into their best resource – their minds – while we are going in the opposite direction.

 

As a student at RMIT University where I recently completed an undergraduate degree, I became well aware of the financial situation. RMIT’s primary analysis suggested that the funding cuts would cost the University more than $25 million over the next four years.

 

Even with the government’s promise to maintain indexation, the massive reductions have made the framing of future budgets increasingly difficult, as RMIT is still carrying the effects of cuts imposed on higher and vocational education in 2012.

 

Australians have the potential to transform our economy and indeed the world.  Despite having less than 0.3% of the world’s population, we account for over three per cent of the world’s scientific research output.

 

The Bionic Ear, Black Box Flight Recorders, spray-on skin for burns victims and WiFi are just some Australian innovations that come to mind.

 

Who do you think drives the innovation behind such products and services and industries? Our universities.

 

Furthermore, the Australian Workforce Productivity Agency found that each extra one dollar invested in tertiary education grows the economy by $26 and grows tax revenue by $8. I really can’t think of any public funded investment which pays itself off better than investment in tertiary education.

 

To invest in universities is to invest in our future.

 

I don’t understand politicians. I don’t think most people do. But to me it’s clear: the Federal Government needs to stop cutting and start investing more into our tertiary education.

 

 

 

By Vince Stefano