Investing superannuation funds in a way that most benefits Australia

The commencement of infrastructure projects is vital for Australia, yet we are hampered by debt and the lack of capital for long-term investments.

One way of providing such capital is by directing superannuation funds into infrastructure projects that are of long-term national interest.

Courtesy of dream designs at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Courtesy of dream designs at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Employers are required by law to contribute 9 per cent (in some cases more) of each worker’s salary to a fund – in other words a tax levied for the express purpose of self-funding retirement benefits.

These funds choose to invest the proceeds wherever, and however, they want. Much of the proceeds are invested overseas, where the risk can be much more difficult to assess and which generates no home-grown advantages.

There is no obligation to invest even part of their funds, or at least to give preference to investing part of their funds, in infrastructure projects that directly benefit the Australian economy and employment.

Further, of the many billions of dollars held by superannuation funds, very little is re-invested back into the regions.

Surely it is perfectly reasonable for people living in rural and regional Australia to desire to ensure, that the superannuation that each person contributes to, should be equitably re-invested into that part of the country that they are living and employed in?

The Democratic Labour Party believes that this is an area that merits significant consideration, and will support ways that encourage funds to invest in Australian infrastructure projects, and in regional and rural Australia.

To view the DLP’s full superannuation policy, click here.

A State Development Bank will provide much needed long-term funding

Infrastructure has been one of the hot topics for this year’s Victorian State Election. Both major parties are desperately competing to win the public with their infrastructure policies. It’s fair to say that the approach has been a bit like “whatever you can do, I can do better”.

The DLP has long supported the idea of Development Banks to drive long-term investment such as that needed for infrastructure. This policy stance stems from the DLP objective to “establish the economic foundations for a self-reliant and secure Australia.”

Such a bank will greatly relieve budgetary restraints. It would be Victorian owned and operated, external to the Treasury and ongoing budget requirements.

 

In short, a State Development Bank will:finance

  • Build ongoing revenue for infrastructure, regional development and other long-term projects
  • Engage in and benefit from its long-term projects
  • Have a positive development and stabilising effect on the Victorian economy
  • Relieve state budgetary restraints
  • Encourage innovation
  • Not interfere with private banking, but rather free up funds used by government for infrastructure borrowing
  • Eliminate or reduce the need for governments to seek funding in foreign markets
  • Potentially buy into selected industries to protect Victoria’s economic sovereignty

 

The finance market is bound to have a shortage of long-term capital, as savers typically look for more short-term, “liquid” investments which results in inadequate investment in sectors with potential for long-term growth. Infrastructure is a key example, as it requires long-term investment and is a prerequisite for and a facilitator of growth in other sectors.

A State Development Bank would use its funds to finance public and private enterprises, mostly for infrastructure and long-term investment, but also for regional development and capital for small and medium enterprises.

Unlike investment banks, a development bank would give priority to the financing of projects that yield substantial social and environmental as well as economic benefits. Before financing projects, while requiring a minimum financial rate of return, a development bank would also make economic, social and environmental appraisals of those projects.

State-owned banks such as the one proposed here should not be compared to commercial banks and judged on their profitability, but judged on the basis of their development and stabilising effect.

The DLP’s aim to build a strong, self-sustaining Victorian economy draws on the German experience.

Germany represents an example of an advanced, high-wage economy with generous conditions for workers being able to run a profitable manufacturing sector for example.  Our mud map of the German approach is this:

  • Commitment to high-end manufacturing;
  • Reputation for quality and prestige;
  • Flexibility and productivity in the workplace that allows for good wages without sacrificing competitive advantage;
  • Integrated educational and training approach to maintain a supply of well trained employees in all areas of the business and service industries;
  • Adoption of the Mittelstand approach, where vast numbers of SMEs often based on cooperative principles, provide a shock absorber during lean times.

 

The DLP has also long advocated for the establishment of a Federal Development Bank.

 

What we will do:

If the DLP is successful in winning a seat within the Victorian Parliament, we will:

  • in our maiden speech, explain our commitment to distributive principles and the introduction of a State Development Bank;
  • within 12 months, present a plan to State Parliament on the implementation of the Bank.

 

 

 

 

Authorised by Michael Murphy, 14 Coventry Place, South Melbourne