Archives for September 2017

Banned West Papua independence petition handed to UN

Document outlawed by Indonesia was ‘smuggled from one end of Papua to the other’ and signed by 70% of the population.

Australia must support the pleas of the West Papuans on the floor of the United Nations. The DLP is committed to the cause of the West Papuan people.

The following story in the Guardian explains how 1.8 million West Papuans have taken an incredibly brave and dangerous stand against the threats of the Indonesian military in the hope that the world will finally open its eyes to the atrocities they have endured for over 50 years.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/sep/27/banned-west-papua-independence-petition-un

 

DLP members vote NO to same sex marriage

Australians are fair and reasonable people. We may disagree with each other on many issues but we never stop those we disagree with from having their say. While the DLP does not agree with same sex marriage we believe those who do believe in it are entitled to have their say. That is a basic principle of our democratic society. Anyone abusing or threatening another because they hold a different view are neither a fair minded or democratic Australian.

[Read more…]

West Papua Independence Day

West-Papua-Flag-300x182The 1st of December, marks West Papua’s original independence day when the Morning Star flag was first raised in 1961.

The Dutch had prepared West Papua for independence. However, within months, the Indonesian military invaded – determined to include the resource-rich land as part of their nation.
The United Nations declared that West Papuans were to be given the “opportunity to exercise freedom of choice” through consultation and a referendum, with voting rights for all adult males and females. However, it was only a bogus referendum that followed, with 1026 Papuans (out of 1 million) picked to vote in 1969. Under severe duress, including threats of torture and death, they voted to remain part of Indonesia. The UN shamefully sanctioned the result.

Since then, West Papuans have been slaughtered, tortured, raped, culturally oppressed, discriminated against, denied the most fundamental freedoms and have seen their homes burned to the ground.  

The Morning Star flag is recognised as the national flag of West Papua and continues to be the defining symbol for a Free West Papua – “Parpua Merdeka”. Today it is illegal to raise this flag in West Papua and people who do face arrest, torture and long jail sentences. On this day, people from around the world raise the Morning Star flag to stand in solidarity with the West Papuans. Over the past several years the international community, including a number of the Pacific nations, has become increasingly aware of the West Papua situation and is advocating for their freedom. 

The Democratic Labour Party maintains its position that there must be a new, and proper, vote for independence by the indigenous people of West Papua.

In keeping with our long held position the DLP calls on the Australian Government ro show support for the plight of the people of West Papua by establishing a West Papuan Solidarity Day, including a public raising of the Morning Star Flag on 1 December each year until a United Nations supervised free vote is held.

The Democratic Labour Party Federal Secretary, Stephen Campbell, states that the DLP believes there has been a decades long cover up by consecutive Australian governments who have turned a blind eye to the sufferings of the West Papuan people in return for favourable treatment by the Indonesian government.

“West Papua was forcibly annexed by Indonesia in 1962 and since that time the West Papuan people have suffered from atrocities such as torture, murder, rape, oppression, forced removal of their children, and other crimes against humanity by the Indonesian authorities.”

“Surely history has taught us that no good can come by ignoring the sufferings of oppressed people” Mr Campbell stated.

“How can we, as Australians, deal with any nation who can invade a neighbouring country then treat the citizens of that country with the sort of inhumane treatment the Indonesians have handed out to the West Papuans? Has East Timor taught us nothing?”

The Democratic Labour Party is calling for all political parties to join them in their call for a nation-wide Solidarity Day in support of the West Papuans commencing on December 1st 2017 and continuing until a free vote is held under the supervision of the United Nations.

 

DLP calls for a nation-wide Solidarity Day in support of West Papuans on December 1st

The Democratic Labour Party has continued its call from 2016 that the Australian Government show support for the plight of the people of West Papua by establishing a West Papuan Solidarity Day, including a public raising of the Morning Star Flag on 1 December each year until a United Nations supervised free vote is held.

The Democratic Labour Party Federal Secretary, Stephen Campbell, states that the DLP believes there has been a decades long cover up by consecutive Australian governments who have turned a blind eye to the sufferings of the West Papuan people in return for favourable treatment by the Indonesian government.

“West Papua was forcibly annexed by Indonesia in 1962 and since that time the West Papuan people have suffered from atrocities such as torture, murder, rape, oppression, forced removal of their children, and other crimes against humanity by the Indonesian authorities.”

“Surely history has taught us that no good can come by ignoring the sufferings of oppressed people” Mr Campbell stated.

“How can we, as Australians, deal with any nation who can invade a neighbouring country then treat the citizens of that country with the sort of inhumane treatment the Indonesians have handed out to the West Papuans? Has East Timor taught us nothing?”

The Democratic Labour Party is calling for all political parties to join them in their call for a nation-wide Solidarity Day in support of the West Papuans commencing on December 1st 2017 and continuing until a free vote is held under the supervision of the United Nations.

 

Australia needs a Development Bank

Infrastructure has been one of the most hotly disputed topics in previous Federal and State elections. Both major parties have been desperately competing to win the public with their infrastructure policies. It’s fair to say that the approach of both parties has been a bit like “whatever you can do, I can do better”.

The DLP has long supported the idea of Development Banks (State and Federal) to drive long-term investment such as that needed for infrastructure. This policy stance stems from the DLP objective to “establish the economic foundations for a self-reliant and secure Australia.”

Such a bank will greatly relieve budgetary restraints. It would be Australian owned and operated, external to the Treasury and ongoing budget requirements.

 

In short, a State Development Bank will:finance

  • Build ongoing revenue for infrastructure, regional development and other long-term projects
  • Engage in and benefit from its long-term projects
  • Have a positive development and stabilising effect on the Federal and State economies
  • Relieve state budgetary restraints
  • Encourage innovation
  • Not interfere with private banking, but rather free up funds used by government for infrastructure borrowing
  • Eliminate or reduce the need for governments to seek funding in foreign markets
  • Potentially buy into selected industries to protect Australia’s economic sovereignty

 

The finance market is bound to have a shortage of long-term capital, as savers typically look for more short-term, “liquid” investments which results in inadequate investment in sectors with potential for long-term growth. Infrastructure is a key example, as it requires long-term investment and is a prerequisite for and a facilitator of growth in other sectors.

A Development Bank would use its funds to finance public and private enterprises, mostly for infrastructure and long-term investment, but also for regional development and capital for Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs).

Unlike investment banks, a development bank would give priority to the financing of projects that yield substantial social and environmental as well as economic benefits. Before financing projects, while requiring a minimum financial rate of return, a development bank would also make economic, social and environmental appraisals of those projects.

Federal and State-owned banks such as the one proposed here should not be compared to commercial banks and judged on their profitability, but judged on the basis of their development and stabilising effect.

The DLP’s aim to build strong, self-sustaining Federal and State economies draws on the successful German experience.

Germany represents an example of an advanced, high-wage economy with generous conditions for workers being able to run a profitable manufacturing sector.  

Basically the German approach is:

  • Commitment to high-end manufacturing;
  • Reputation for quality and prestige;
  • Flexibility and productivity in the workplace that allows for good wages without sacrificing competitive advantage;
  • Integrated educational and training approach to maintain a supply of well trained employees in all areas of the business and service industries;
  • Adoption of the Mittelstand approach, where vast numbers of SMEs, many based on cooperative principles, provide a shock absorber during lean times.

 

The DLP remains committed to the establishment of Federal and State Development Banks to ensure the long term security of Australia’s economy.